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Egypt and Post-Revolution Economy

The Egyptian economy is believed to be currently undergoing a transitional period. Come 2012, however, the economy will be out of the bottle neck.

The Egyptian economy is believed to be currently undergoing a transitional period. Come 2012, however, the economy will be past convalescence and will be out of the bottle neck. 2013 will see it launch towards real growth and progress.

The January 25th Revolution should not be conceived solely as a political revolution but also as one with economic impact which seeks:

• To eliminate the negative effects represented in the following: many factories have currently stopped working as a result of labor problems and/or the absence of raw materials; the tourism sector has suffered major losses as a result of canceled reservations; local and foreign investments have declined as a result of political and security issues; and state revenues are down, budget deficit up and hard currency reserves dwindling.

• To develop a short-, medium- and long-range strategy, which would gives priority to productive economy and allows the state to play its role in financing major projects.

• To set an economic revival plan, restructure public spending and end market monopolization, with the end of streamlining profits, fairly pricing commodities and services and restructuring salaries.

This sums up the hopes of all Egyptians, who aspire to an advancing state, whose people stand equal to the world’s most developed nations and who contribute to the makings of modern civilization.